Faculty

Primary Appointments

Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Area of Expertise: Epidemiology Dr. Akinyemiju is a social and molecular cancer epidemiologist with expertise in epidemiologic methods, translational research, health disparities and global health.  Her research interests focus on identifying the impact of social (such as access to healthcare) and biological factors (such as metabolic dysregulation), on cancer related risk, tumor aggressiveness and survival. She has a specific interest in understanding the causes of cancer disparities among women of African descent in the US and sub-Saharan Africa, given their significantly higher risk of aggressive cancer subtypes relative to other racial groups. To achieve these research aims, she utilizes data from population-based cancer registries, administrative claims, and existing cohort studies. Dr. Akinyemiju also leads several primary epidemiologic research studies. She is the PI of a case-control study of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients and healthy women in Nigeria designed to elucidate the impact of metabolic dysregulation, highly prevalent due to the epidemiologic transition, on hormone-receptor negative breast cancer subtypes and associated epigenetic mechanisms. In addition, Dr. Akinyemiju leads an R01 study designed to characterize racial differences across multiple healthcare access dimensions among US ovarian cancer patients, and evaluate the impact of differential healthcare on quality of initial and supportive treatment, and quality of life. A parallel line of research focuses on identifying lifestyle intervention strategies to improve metabolic health among breast cancer patients as a mortality prevention strategy. Dr. Akinyemiju is also passionate about promoting inclusion and diversity in research, teaching and service, and serves as the Director for Inclusion and Diversity at the Duke University Department of Population Health Sciences. 
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Bosworth is a health services research and Associate Director of the Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care at the Durham VA Medical Center. He is also a Professor of Medicine, Psychiatry, and Nursing at Duke University Medical Center and Adjunct Professor in Health Policy and Administration at the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests comprise three overarching areas of research: 1) clinical research that provides knowledge for improving patients’ treatment adherence and self-management in chronic care; 2) translation research to improve access to quality of care; and 3) eliminate health care disparities.  Dr. Bosworth is the recipient of an American Heart Association established investigator award, the 2013 VA Undersecretary Award for Outstanding Achievement in Health Services Research (The annual award is the highest honor for VA health services researchers), and a VA Senior Career Scientist Award. In terms of self-management, Dr. Bosworth has expertise developing interventions to improve health behaviors related to hypertension, coronary artery disease, and depression, and has been developing and implementing tailored patient interventions to reduce the burden of other chronic diseases. These trials focus on motivating individuals to initiate health behaviors and sustaining them long term and use members of the healthcare team, particularly pharmacists and nurses. He has been the Principal Investigator of over 20 trials resulting in over 350 peer reviewed publications and four books. This work has been or is being implemented in multiple arenas including Medicaid of North Carolina, The United Kingdom National Health System Direct, Kaiser Health care system, and the Veterans Affairs.Areas of Expertise: Health Behavior, Health Services Research, Implementation Science, Health Measurement, and Health Policy
Instructor in the Department of Population Health Sciences
Areas of Expertise: Clinical Decision Sciences, Epidemiology, and Health Services Research
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Devon Check, PhD is a health services researcher focused on understanding and overcoming barriers to the delivery of equitable, high-quality care for patients with cancer and other potentially life-limiting conditions.Dr. Check received her PhD in Health Policy and Management from the Gillings School of Global Public Health at UNC-Chapel Hill. Prior to joining the Department of Population Health Sciences at Duke, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Delivery Science at Kaiser Permanente Northern California.Areas of Expertise: Implementation Science and Health Services Research
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Theresa Coles, PhD, is a health outcomes methodologist with a focus on measuring and evaluating patient-reported outcomes (PROs), integrating PRO measures in clinical care, and improving interpretation of patient-centered outcome scores.
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
A social scientist by training, Dr. Corneli has conducted qualitative and mixed-method research primarily in biomedical HIV prevention and bioethics in multiple countries in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia, and in the U.S.  A significant portion of her research portfolio has focused on engaging patients/participants and other key stakeholders in qualitative research to inform clinical research, socio-behavioral interventions, and material and scale/questionnaire development as well as to assess participant perceptions of intervention/clinical trial implementation. Her HIV-related research focuses on identifying evidence-based strategies for linking populations at HIV risk to PrEP care, support PrEP adherence to achieve protective levels, and keep clients engaged in PrEP care for as long as their HIV risk persists. Her research in bioethics has explored innovative methods for improving informed consent comprehension and shortening consent forms, the acceptability of informed assent, and the functioning of research ethics committees. Areas of expertise: HIV, qualitative research methods, bioethics, health behavior
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Curtis is a health services researcher who oversees a portfolio of projects that use observational data to address questions related to clinical and comparative effectiveness, pharmacoepidemiology, health care delivery, and epidemiological trends across a broad array of clinical conditions and clinical care settings. An expert in the use of Medicare claims data for health services and clinical outcomes research, she has led the linkage of Medicare claims with several large clinical registries and epidemiological cohort studies including the Framingham Heart Study and the Cardiovascular Health Study.  Dr Curtis directs the Center for Pragmatic Health Systems Research at the Duke Clinical Research Institute and leads the Distributed Research Network Operations Center for PCORI’s National Clinical Research Network (PCORnet), working with health systems and patient networks to develop a harmonized data infrastructure for robust observational and interventional research.Areas of expertise: Health Services Research and Health Policy  
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Dinan is a health services researcher with a focus on emerging medical technology in cancer. Dr. Dinan currently holds an AHRQ K99/R00 pathway to independence award to examine adoption of Oncotype DX molecular testing in breast cancer and has conducted work in breast and other cancers examining emerging technologies and their associated disparities in utilization, outcomes and costs. Dr. Dinan has expertise in both secondary data analysis and clinical registry methodologies. Her secondary data expertise include the SEER-Medicare linked data, Medicare claims, NIS, NCDB, as well as EHR data. Dr. Dinan holds additional appointments at the Duke Clinical Research Institute and Duke Cancer Institute where she co-leads the Patient Experience and Survivorship Focus Area in the Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program.Areas of expertise: Health Economics, Health Policy, and Health Services Research
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Dupre is an Associate Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences and Professor in the Department of Sociology. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Center for Aging and Human Development and member of the Cardiovascular Outcomes Group at the Duke Clinical Research Institute. Dr. Dupre is a medical sociologist who specializes in research on aging and the life course, health disparities, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes in older adults. As an interdisciplinary researcher, he has focused on several lines of work: (i) race and socioeconomic disparities in trajectories of chronic disease and mortality, (ii) the role of social stressors in the onset and progression of CVD, (iii) the development of adaptive CVD risk-assessment models, and (iv) the social determinants of healthy aging in China. A unifying thread in his program of research is the application of life course theory to clinical outcomes research, the integration of population- and patient-level data, and the use of innovative statistical methods to better understand how exposure to social factors shape inequalities in health and aging. Dr. Dupre is the Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of Gerontology and Population Aging (in press), co-editor of the book Disability Trends at Older Ages (in press), and has authored more than 60 publications in the leading journals of medicine, epidemiology, sociology, and public health. He has served as an advisor to the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on Population Aging and currently serves on the editorial boards for multiple journals.Areas of Expertise: Social epidemiology; Medical sociology; Health services research; Cardiovascular disease; Aging; and Quantitative methods
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Meira Epplein is a cancer epidemiologist interested in modifiable risk factors in under-served populations, with a focus on the association of infection and cancer.  She became Co-Leader of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at Duke Cancer Institute and Associate Professor of Population Health Sciences in the Duke University Medical Center in May of 2017.  Previously, she was a tenured faculty member at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, after two years as a post-doctoral fellow with the Multiethnic Cohort Study at the University of Hawaii.  Prior to earning her PhD in epidemiology from the University of Washington, she completed an MA in international studies, and spent five years as a program officer for the Asian research think tank, the National Bureau of Asian Research. Dr. Epplein’s research program has centered around the bacteria Helicobacter pylori, a spiral, gram-negative bacterium that infects approximately 50% of the world’s population, and is the leading carcinogenic infectious agent according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer.  Her research seeks to understand the heterogeneity of H. pylori, to determine the most toxigenic forms of the bacteria so to identify the highest risk populations which can then be targeted for antibiotic therapy, which has been shown to be effective for risk reduction. At the same time, she is committed to furthering our understanding of the co-factors involved in both H. pylori-associated disease risk and benefit, as the bacteria has inhabited the stomachs of humans for over 100,000 years, and so very likely also confers certain biological advantages to its hosts. As Principal Investigator, she has obtained three large NIH-funded grants to further explore the epidemiology of H. pylori heterogeneity: a 5-year career development award (K07) from NCI that focuses on infection, inflammation, and cancer; a 5-year R01 from NCI to develop an H. pylori blood biomarker for gastric cancer risk in East Asia; and a 4-year R01, again funded by NCI, to further investigate, in a large consortium of prospective cohorts across the United States, the novel preliminary finding of H. pylori protein-specific antibodies and the risk of colorectal cancer. She also serves as a Co-Investigator and lead gastric cancer and H. pylori researcher for the Southern Community Cohort Study (SCCS). In addition to serving as a standing member of the study section NCI Subcommittee J (Career Development Awards), she is an editorial board member of the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, and is co-chair of the 2017 American Society of Preventive Oncology Annual Meeting Program Committee. Area of expertise: Epidemiology
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Jennifer Gierisch, PhD,  is behavioral scientist and health services researcher. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Population Heath Sciences and the Department of Medicine at Duke University. She is a core investigator with the Center of Innovation to Accelerate Discovery and Practice Transformation (ADAPT)  where she serves as the leader of the Stakeholder Engagement Core and Director of the VA OAA Health Services Research Postdoctoral Fellowship. Dr. Gierisch also is the Co-Director of the Evidence Synthesis Program (VA ESP) at the Durham Veteran Affairs Health Care System. She is the Co-Director of the Duke Clinical Translational Science Institute's  Community Engaged Research Initiative (CeRi). Dr. Gierisch’s research focuses on three overarching areas: 1) behavioral research on the psychosocial factors that influence appropriate uptake and maintenance of complex health behaviors (eg., weight management, smoking cessation, cancer screening); 2) evidence synthesis on key health and healthcare topics to enhance uptake of evidence-based interventions to improve patient and health system outcomes; and 3) stakeholder and community engagement in the research enterprise. Area of expertise: Health Behavior, Community-engaged Research, Evidence Synthesis 
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Gonzalez is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences. He is an expert in the design of stated-preference survey instruments and the use of advanced statistical tools to analyze stated-preference data. His research has focused on the transparency in benefit-risk evaluations of medical interventions, and the elicitation of health preferences from multiple stakeholders to support shared decision making. Dr. Gonzalez co-led the first FDA-sponsored preference study which was highlighted in FDA’s recent precedent-setting guidance for submitting patient-preference evidence to inform regulatory benefit-risk evaluations of new medical devices. More recently, Dr. Gonzalez collaborated with the Medical Devices Innovation Consortium (MDIC) to prepare the first catalog of preference-elicitation methods (part of the Patient-Centered Benefit-Risk Assessment Framework) suitable for benefit-risk assessments of medical devices. As a core group member of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Conjoint Analysis Task Force, Dr. Gonzalez helped draft good-practice recommendations for statistical analysis, interpretation, and reporting of health preference data. Currently, he is working with the Center for Devices and Radiological Health at FDA to support the development of the Center’s capabilities for the review of stated-preference data in regulatory decisions. Areas of expertise: Clinical Decision Sciences and Health Measurement
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Areas of expertise: Health Services Research, Health Policy, and Epidemiology
Medical Instructor in the Department of Population Health Sciences
Areas of expertise: Health Behavior, Health Services Research, and Implementation Science
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Areas of expertise: Epidemiology, Health Services Research, and Implementation Science
Professor in Population Health Sciences
F. Reed Johnson, PhD, has more than 40 years of academic and research experience in health and environmental economics. He has served on the faculties of several universities in the United States, Canada, and Sweden, and as Distinguished Fellow at Research Triangle Institute. He currently is Senior Research Scholar in the Duke Clinical Research Institute. As a staff member in the US Environmental Protection Agency’s environmental economics research program during the 1980s, Reed helped pioneer the development of basic non­-market valuation techniques which are widely used for benefit-cost analysis in health and environmental economics. He has designed and analyzed numerous surveys for measuring preferences for and value of health outcomes, health ­risk reductions, and improved environmental quality. Dr. Johnson has over 140 publications in books and peer-reviewed journals. His research has been published in various medical journals, the Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Health Economics, Medical Decision Making, Health Economics, Value in Health, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and other journals. He has coauthored a book on techniques for using existing environmental and health value estimates for policy analysis. His current research involves quantifying patients’ willingness to accept side­effect risks in return for therapeutic benefits and estimating general time equivalences among health states. He led the first FDA­ sponsored study on patients’ willingness to accept benefit-risk tradeoffs for new health technologies. The study was used to develop recent FDA guidance on submitting patient-preference data to support regulatory reviews of medical devices.Areas of expertise: Clinical Decision Sciences, Health Measurement, Health Policy, and Health Economics
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Areas of expertise: Implementation Science, Health Services Research, and Health Measurement
Medical Instructor in the Department of PopulationHealth Sciences
I am an implementation scientist with focused training in mixed method and community-engaged research, with an emphasis on eliminating pediatric obesity inequities through improving access to healthy foods and physical activity among children who are socially disadvantaged.My research centers around 3 primary focus areas:(1) understanding and improving implementation in order to optimize reach of evidence-based healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in settings (mostly schools) that serve at-risk children;(2) engaging children and adolescents as active participants in implementation research, including developing and testing pragmatic, age-appropriate evaluation metrics;(3) developing measures to improve our understanding of the determinants of health-related decision-making among children and adolescents, in order to better implement health literacy and public health literacy-based programs.While these are the main focus areas of my research, my methods expertise is broadly applicable to other child and adolescent health outcomes. This expertise includes: implementation and dissemination methods, stakeholder-driven research, youth participatory research methods, mixed methods evaluation, pragmatic measures development (including rapid qualitative data collection and analysis), organizational capacity-building, theory-based program development, policy implementation.
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Matt Maciejewski, PhD is a Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences. He is also a Research Career Scientist and Director of the Health Economics and Policy Unit in the Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care at the Durham VA Medical Center. Matt also holds Adjunct Professor appointments in the Schools of Public Health and Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has research interests in four areas: 1) evaluation of surgical and behavioral interventions for the management of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions 2) evaluation of cost-sharing changes on demand for medications and health services 3) analysis of health care utilization and expenditures in experimental and quasi-experimental studies 4) methods for addressing unobserved confounding in observational studies. Matt has received funding from NIDA, CMS, AHRQ, VA HSR&D, and the RWJ Foundation. He has published over 190 papers in peer-reviewed journals such as JAMA, JAMA Internal Medicine, JAMA Surgery, Annals of Internal Medicine, Health Economics, Medical Care, Health Services Research, Journal of Clinical Epidemiology and Diabetes Care.Areas of expertise: Health Services Research, Health Economics, Health Policy, Multimorbidity
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Area of Expertise: Informatics
Instructor in the Department of Population Health Sciences
Areas of Expertise: Bioethics, Qualitative Research Methods, and Health Behavior
Medical Instructor in the Department of Population Health Sciences
Dr. Muiruri is a health services researcher, Medical Instructor in the Duke Department of Population Health Sciences, Assistant Research Professor in the Global Health Institute, and Adjunct lecturer at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Moshi Tanzania. Prior to joining Duke faculty, Charles worked in various Global Health operations and leadership roles within the Duke for over 10 years.Broadly, his research seeks to improve the quality of healthcare and reduce disparities for persons with multiple chronic conditions both in and outside the United States. Dr. Muiruri has worked and published in all the stages of the HIV continuum of care. His current work is focused on extending the HIV cascade of care to include noncommunicable diseases among people living with HIV. Specifically, his current projects focus on using implementation sciences approaches to improve the quality of cardiovascular disease care among people living with HIV with funding from NHLBI and NIMHD.
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
I am an epidemiologist and health services researcher at the Duke Clinical Research Institute. My research focuses on comparative effectiveness, patient-centered outcomes, and pragmatic health services research in cardiovascular and pulmonary disease.Areas of expertise: Epidemiology, Health Services Research, and Clinical Decision Sciences
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Pollak is a social psychologist who designs and tests behavioral interventions to promote smoking cessation, reduce health disparities, and improve clinician-patient communication. She also is one of the heads of the Palliative Care Research Cooperative that supports multi-site palliative care trials. Finally, Dr. Pollak serves as a Communication Coach where she teaches clinicians effective communication techniques.Area of expertise: Health Behavior
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Areas of expertise: Epidemiology and Health Services Research
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Shelby Reed, PhD, RPh is Professor in Population Health Sciences and Medicine at Duke University and Director of the Preference Evaluation Research (PrefER) Group at the Duke Clinical Research Institute.  She also is core faculty and serves on the executive committee at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy. Dr. Reed has 20 years of experience leading multidisciplinary health outcomes research studies. Dr. Reed has extensive expertise in designing and conducting trial-based and model-based cost-effectiveness analyses of diagnostics, drugs and patient-centered interventions. In evaluating health policy issues, she has developed computer models to evaluate the economic impact of trends in clinical trial design, changes in reimbursement policies, a new financing scheme to spur drug development for ultra-rare conditions, and the societal value of alternative approaches to identifying drug safety problems. Over the last several years, her research has increasingly focused on stated-preference studies to evaluate benefit-risk tradeoffs, patient-centered value, and their application in comparative effectiveness research and clinical decision making.  Dr. Reed earned pharmacy and doctoral degrees from the University of Maryland and completed her training in the Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program at the University of Washington. She serves on editorial advisory boards for Value in Health and Health Services Research.  She served as President of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) in 2017-2018. Shelby Reed, PhD, RPh is Professor in Population Health Sciences and Medicine at Duke University and Director of the Preference Evaluation Research (PrefER) Group at the Duke Clinical Research Institute.  She also is core faculty and serves on the executive committee at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy. Dr. Reed has 20 years of experience leading multidisciplinary health outcomes research studies. Dr. Reed has extensive expertise in designing and conducting trial-based and model-based cost-effectiveness analyses of diagnostics, drugs and patient-centered interventions. In evaluating health policy issues, she has developed computer models to evaluate the economic impact of trends in clinical trial design, changes in reimbursement policies, a new financing scheme to spur drug development for ultra-rare conditions, and the societal value of alternative approaches to identifying drug safety problems. Over the last several years, her research has increasingly focused on stated-preference studies to evaluate benefit-risk tradeoffs, patient-centered value, and their application in comparative effectiveness research and clinical decision making.  Dr. Reed earned pharmacy and doctoral degrees from the University of Maryland and completed her training in the Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program at the University of Washington. She serves on editorial advisory boards for Value in Health and Health Services Research.  She served as President of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) in 2017-2018. she is currently Chair of ISPOR's Health Science Policy Council.   Areas of expertise: Health Economics, Health Measurement, Stated Preference Research, Health Policy, and Health Services Research
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Areas of expertise: Health Measurement and Health Services Research
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Richman's research broadly focuses on understanding factors that contribute to health disparities for disadvantaged groups. Some research areas include the role of social status, gentrification, and social network characteristics on health behaviors and outcomes. Click here for .pdf links to my publicationsAreas of expertise: Health Behavior and Health Measurement
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
For an up-to-date description of my research program please visithttps://ryser.netlify.comAreas of Expertise: Multi-scale modeling, early carcinogenesis, cancer evolution
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Areas of expertise: Clinical Decision Sciences, Health Services Research, and Health Policy
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Megan Shepherd-Banigan is an Assistant Professor in Duke University’s Department of Population Health Science and School of Medicine. She is also a Health Research Scientist at the Durham VA. She received her PhD in Health Services Research from the University of Washington. She focuses on mental health, aging, and health services research methods that improve the health, emotional well-being, and social functioning of adults with mental and physical disabilities. Her research has focused on how parental disability and caregiving affect the health of children, how to integrate family caregivers into the health system, and integrate family-centered innovations in to health care. Dr. Shepherd Banigan’s methods combine empirical approaches that address methodologically challenging research questions in health systems and policy research.  Dr. Shepherd-Banigan won a VA Career Development Award from 2019-2024 that will determine ways to strengthen family support for veterans under-going traumatic stress treatment. She is a co-investigator in the Durham VA-Cares Evaluation Center where she leads a project that surveys family caregivers of Vietnam-era veterans who might be eligible for expanded support services under the VA Mission Act. As co-investigator on an NIA-funded CARE IDEAS study, she is investigating outcomes among care partners and persons with dementia (Terri Wetle, PI) where she will examine patient/caregiver communication and drivers of long-term care preferences. Finally, Dr. Shepherd-Banigan is leading a Rosalynn Carter Institute project that explores the effects of a caregiver training program on child anxiety. Areas of Expertise: Health Services Research, Health Policy, and Health Economics
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Areas of expertise: Bioethics, Medical Anthropology, Qualitative Research Methods
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Areas of expertise: Health Services Research, Implementation Science, Health Policy and Epidemiology Asheley Cockrell Skinner, PhD, is a health services researcher whose work addresses a variety of population health issues, particularly implementation of programs to improve the health of vulnerable populations. She is currently an Associate Professor at Duke University in Population Health Sciences. She received her PhD in 2007 in Health Policy and Administration at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  A nationally-known expert in childhood obesity, her work uses a data-driven approach to understand pediatric obesity and improve implementation of evidence-based treatment. She applies this implementation science approach to other populations, including children involved in child welfare investigations and individuals affected by opioid use or misuse. In addition to her many roles in research, she also currently serves as the Director of Graduate Studies for Population Health Sciences, directs multiple training programs, and actively mentors undergraduate and graduate students, fellows, and junior faculty.
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Valerie A. Smith, DrPH, is a biostatistician, Assistant Professor in the Duke University Department of Population Health Sciences, and investigator at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center's Center of Innovation. Her methodological research interests include: methods for semicontinuous and zero-inflated data, economic modeling methods, causal inference methods, observational study design, and longitudinal data analysis. Her current methodological research has focused on the development of marginalized models for semicontinuous data. Dr. Smith works largely in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team of researchers, with a focus on health policy interventions, health care utilization and expenditure patterns, program and policy evaluation, obesity and weight loss, bariatric surgery evaluation, and family caregiver supportive services.Areas of expertise: Biostatistics, Health Services Research, Health Economics, and Health Policy
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Sorenson has extensive research and policy expertise in value assessment in health care, comparative effectiveness research, drug and device regulation and payment, and health policy evaluation. She is interested in the design, implementation, and assessment of innovative, evidence-based strategies to enhance value-based health care, particularly with regards to new and existing health care treatments and services. In this work, she also examines the economic, methodological, political, cultural, organizational, professional, and legal levers that support or hinder the adoption of such approaches.     Dr. Sorenson’s work also focuses on education and training development in health policy and management. She is currently Faculty Director of Graduate Education Initiatives and the Margolis Scholars in Health Policy and Management Program at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy. Outside of academe, Dr. Sorenson has served in senior health care consulting and policy positions in both the private and public sectors. She has also worked in an advisory capacity for governmental organizations in several countries on development of national and regional health technology assessment systems.  
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Areas of expertise: Health Services Research, Health Measurement, and Implementation Science
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Steinhauser's primary interests are end-of-life care, medical sociology and patient-provider relationships. Specifically, she investigates the composition and measurement of the quality of life for patients and their families at the end of life. Dr. Steinhauser is a Health Scientist with the Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, VA Medical Center, Durham; Professor, Department of Population Health Science and Medicine; Senior Fellow with the Duke University Center for Aging; Associate Chief for Research, Duke Palliative Care, and Director, Duke Residency Professional Development Coaching Program.  Karen E. Steinhauser, PhD is a social scientist dedicated to improving quality of life of patients, families, and providers during serious illness.  She is a Health Scientist with the Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, VA Medical Center, Durham and Associate Research Professor, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Senior Fellow with the Duke University Center for Aging, and a former VA Career Development Awardee.  She has conducted cross-sectional and longitudinal observational and interventional, and qualitative and quantitative studies in pursuit of improve understanding of factors that influence quality of life and how they may be addressed in care.  For example, Dr. Steinhauser was Project Director and Co- Investigator of an NIH five-year study, “Trajectories of Serious Illness: Patients and Caregivers,” Principal Investigator of studies to develop measures of quality of life for patients (the QUAL-E ) and families (the QUAL-E fam) in palliative care settings and Principal Investigator of a VA and NIH randomized controlled trials examining the impact of a psychosocial intervention symptoms and quality of life in patients with advanced life limiting illness among (called OUTLOOK).  She is Principal Investigator of an RCT of a caregiver version of the intervention, called Caregiver Outlook, for families of veterans with life-limiting illness.  She piloted tested a chaplains-delivered version of Caregiver Outlook to families of those with cancer and ALS. She conducts work with the VA Mental Health and Chaplaincy program focused on veteran spirituality and health and recently co-led a state of the science conference on spirituality and palliative care research.  Dr. Steinhauser is a member of the scientific review committee for the National Center for Palliative Care Research.  She is the recipient of the American Association of Hospice and Palliative Medicine’s 2015 Award for Scientific Excellence. She is the Director of Duke’s Residency Professional Development Coaching Program and Associate Director of Research for Palliative Care. Area of expertise: Palliative Care, Qualitative Research
Mary D.B.T. and James H. Semans International Professor
Areas of Expertise: Health Services Research, Health Policy, Disease Control Strategy, and Implementation Science
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Courtney Van Houtven is a Professor in The Department of Population Health Science, Duke University School of Medicine and Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy.  She is also a Research Scientist in Health Services Research and Development in Primary Care at the Durham Veteran’s Administration. Dr. Van Houtven’s aging and economics research interests encompass long-term care financing, intra-household decision-making, informal care, and end-of-life care. She examines how family caregiving affects health care utilization, expenditures, health and work outcomes of care recipients and caregivers. She is also interested in understanding how best to support family caregivers to optimize caregiver and care recipient outcomes.In an R-01 from The National Institutes of Nursing Research, NIH, Dr. Van Houtven examined the relationship between family structure, informal caregiving, and long-term care insurance (2011-2014). She recently completed an RCT testing the effectiveness of a skills training program for family caregivers of Veteran patients with functional and/or cognitive limitations who were referred to community-based long-term care, or HI-FIVES (VA HSR&D IIR 11-345). She is co-PI on the newly awarded QUERI Program Project, “Optimizing Function and Independence”, leading implementation of HI-FIVES at 8 sites nationally. She directs the VA-Cares Evaluation Center in the Durham COIN, which recently completed a national evaluation of the VA’s Program of Comprehensive Assistance for Family Caregivers (PCAFC), a program that supports family members who care for injured post-9/11 Veterans. She is a co-investigator on the NIA/NIH CARE IDEAS R01 study examining outcomes among care partners and persons with cognitive impairment and dementia (Vince Mor, PI) and on an R01 called "Informal Caregiver Burden in Advanced Cancer: Economic and Health Outcomes" (Siminoff and Matsuyama, Co-PIs). Areas of expertise: Health Services Research and Health Economics
Medical Instructor in the Department of Population Health Sciences
Area of expertise: Health Behavior
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Areas of expertise: Health Services Research, Health Policy, and Implementation Science
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Qingyi Wei, MD, PhD, Professor in the Department of Medicine, is Associate Director for Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Co-leader of CCPS and Co-leader of Epidemiology and Population Genomics (Focus Area 1). He is a professor of Medicine and an internationally recognized epidemiologist focused on the molecular and genetic epidemiology of head and neck cancers, lung cancer, and melanoma. His research focuses on biomarkers and genetic determinants for the DNA repair deficient phenotype and variations in cell death. He is Editor-in-Chief of the open access journal "Cancer Medicine" and Associate Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Molecular Epidemiology and Genetics.Area of Expertise: Epidemiology
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Kevin P. Weinfurt, PhD, is a professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Duke University School of Medicine. He holds a secondary appointment as a professor of psychology and neuroscience. He is co-director of the Clinical Research Training Program (Masters degree offered through the School of Medicine). Dr. Weinfurt conducts research on measuring patient-reported outcomes, medical decision making, and bioethics. In addition to conducting research, Dr. Weinfurt has taught undergraduate courses in introductory psychology, judgment and decision making, the psychology of medical decision making; and graduate courses in multivariate statistics and patient-reported outcomes research.Areas of Expertise: Bioethics, Health Measurement, Health Services Research, and Health Behavior
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Zigler is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences and part of the Center for Health Measurement. A psychometrician and statistician by training, she is an expert in the development and evaluation of clinical outcome measures. Her particular specialty is in designing patient-centered tools for children with rare diseases. She recently developed a patient-reported outcome measure to capture quality of life impact in children and adolescents with localized scleroderma, and is collaborating with a multidisciplinary team to adapt the measure for adults. She also is working with the Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics (FAST) to design and evaluate a caregiver-reported measure to assess communication changes in individuals with Angelman Syndrome. The resulting tool will serve as an outcome measure in future clinical trials. Dr. Zigler received her PhD in Research Methodology from the University of Pittsburgh and her MSEd in Counseling Psychology from the University of Miami. She has been involved in research for over 12 years and has published applied work in rheumatology, pediatrics, human engineering, veterans’ affairs, and rehabilitation science. Her other methodological interests include multilevel modeling, structural equation modeling, small sample size statistical methods, and anchoring vignettes. Areas of Expertise: Health Measurement, Health Behavior, and Health Services Research
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Leah L. Zullig, PhD, MPH is a health services researcher, Associate Professor in the Duke Department of Population Health Sciences, investigator at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Management at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research is supported by a VA HSR&D Career Development Award, focused on improving colorectal cancer survivors’ care quality through a self-management intervention bridging cancer surveillance and chronic disease management. Dr. Zullig’s overarching research interests address the reduction of healthcare disparities, improving cancer care delivery and quality, and promoting cancer survivorship and chronic disease self-management. She has authored over 90 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Zullig completed her BS in Health Promotion, her MPH in Public Health Administration, and her PhD in Health Policy.Areas of expertise: Implementation Science, Health Measurement, Health Policy, Health Behavior, and Health Services Research

Secondary Appointments

Associate Professor Track V in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Armstrong's clinical and research interests include pediatric nutrition and the treatment of childhood and adolescent obesity, along with related health problems. As director of the Duke Children's Healthy Lifestyles Program, Dr. Armstrong oversees a cohort of over 3000 overweight children and teenagers. She is a member of the Executive Committee for the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Obesity.  Dr. Armstrong's research focuses on leveraging innovative strategies to improve children's nutrition and activity, including mobile health interventions, community partnerships, and medication or surgical approaches.
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Solomon Aronson, MD, MBA, FACC, FACCP, FAHA, FASE  Solomon Aronson is a tenured professor at Duke University and Executive Vice Chairman in the Department of Anesthesiology. Dr. Aronson earned his BS in molecular biology with distinction at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and his MD with honors in research at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. After completing an anesthesiology residency including a year as chief resident at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, he completed a fellowship in cardiac and vascular anesthesia at the Texas Heart Institute in Houston.  Thereafter was recruited to the University of Chicago where he ascending to the rank of full professor and served as chief of the cardiothoracic and vascular anesthesia division for 12 years. In 2011, Dr. Aronson received his MBA with a concentration in Health Sector Management at Duke University Fuqua School of Business. Having written over 300 manuscripts, book chapters, abstracts as well as 5 textbooks, he is recognized as an expert on topics concerning perioperative echocardiography, surgical anticoagulation and blood management, perioperative blood pressure risk, healthcare strategy and health economics as well as other related topics in cardiovascular anesthesia and cardiology, he has lectured nationally and internationally.   Among the many research awards and lecture honors received over the years, Dr. Aronson has been repeatedly elected from among his peers to be listed in Best Doctors in America. Dr. Aronson continues to serve on the Joint Commission and AMA task force for overuse as well as the FDA as a consultant SGE after having served on the FDA as a member of the Anesthesia and Life support advisory committee and Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee (AADPAC). He is an elected fellow of the American Heart Association, the American College of Chest Physicians, the American College of Cardiology, and the American Society of Echocardiography and an elective member of the Association of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologist and Association of University Anesthesiologists.   Dr. Aronson is the director of strategic business development for the Physicians Diagnostic Clinic (PDC), a 1600 member physician practice group at Duke and has severed as chair of the Finance Committee for the PDC in the past. He currently serves on the PDC Board of managers.  He has served as a member of the economic committee of the American Society of Anesthesiologists for over 10 years and currently serves on the Future Models of Anesthesia Practice committee for the ASA.  In addition, he served on the board of directors and was president of the intraoperative council in the American Society of Echocardiography and he also served on the board of directors and was president for the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology. He remains on the board of trustees for the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology Foundation. He is a founding trustee member of the National Board of Echocardiography and has served on their board of directors. In 2013, he was elected to serve on the Science Accelerator Committee and the Leadership Committee for Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative & Resuscitation Council of the American Heart Association. Dr. Aronson is married to Dr. Leena Sharma and they have 2 children – twins- in college. In addition to enjoying time with his family, he works at his tennis and golf games, listens to music, pursues drawing and painting interests and enjoys traveling and serving his community. He currently serves on the board of directors for the Boys and Girls Club of America in Durham.
Assistant Professor - Track V in Population Health Sciences
I am a Research Health Scientist at Durham VA Health Services Research & Development, Senior Fellow at the Duke Center for the Study of Aging & Human Development, and Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy Core Faculty. My research has focused on assessing patients’ and caregivers’ experiences and expectations of health care delivery during advanced illness and near the end of life, largely using qualitative research methods. I have experience in clinical medicine, health care administration, health professions education, hospice and palliative care quality improvement, and community-based research. As a VA Career Development Awardee, I am designing a community-based lay navigator program targeting caregivers’ social and practical needs as they engage in their complex roles as caregivers of Veterans with advanced stage illness.
Professor Track - V in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Boulware is the Eleanor Easley Chair in the School of Medicine, Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine in the Department of Medicine, Vice Dean for Translational Science, and Associate Vice Chancellor for Translational Research at Duke University. She is a general internist and clinical epidemiologist. She studies mechanisms to improve the quality and equity of health care and health outcomes for individuals and populations affected by chronic health conditions including kidney disease and hypertension. Her work explores how the characteristics of individuals, health care providers, and health care organizations contribute to individuals’ health, and importantly, inequities in health. She develops and studies pragmatic interventions to address these mechanisms. Dr. Boulware frequently directly engages individuals, their family members, community members, and other stakeholders in her work. As Director of the Duke Clinical and Translational Science Institute, she helps scientists at Duke and across the nation speed the pace at which their scientific discoveries reach individuals, their families, and their communities. Dr. Boulware received an A.B. from Vassar College, an M.D. from Duke University, and a M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research has been funded by numerous organizations, including the National Institutes for Health, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, and foundations. She has published over 150 manuscripts, book chapters, and editorials, and she mentors numerous students, fellows, and faculty members.  Dr. Boulware is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the National Academy of Medicine.
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
I am a geriatrician with research training in population health and chronic disease epidemiology. Through my work, I aim to inform patient-centered care that focuses on optimizing function and quality of life over traditional disease-based approaches. Much of my work has focused on chronic kidney disease, however I have recently broadened the scope of investigation to include other chronic conditions including hypertension and systemic lupus erythematosus. The unifying theme of this work has been applying a geriatric research approach to large studies of chronic disease. As Associate Director of Clinical Programs at the Durham VA Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, I have also had the opportunity to partner with nephrologists to develop clinical programs in the VA designed to provide patient-centered, geriatric care for older adults with kidney disease.
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Everett joined the faculty of the Department of Community and Family Medicine at Duke University in August 2013 and gained a secondary appointment in the Department of Population Health in 2018. Prior to joining the faculty, she worked clinically in emergency departments in rural Wisconsin. Prior to becoming a physician assistant (PA), Dr. Everett worked in research at the National Institutes of Health and public health policy at the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Everett’s current research initiatives focus on healthcare team design and the impact on patient, provider, and organizational outcomes. Recent work has focused on understanding the role of primary care PAs and nurse practitioners (NPs) and how they relate to outcomes for patients with diabetes. Her work has been published in a variety of journals including Health Affairs, Journal of Rural Health , Medical Care Research and Review, and BMC Family Practice. She completed the first comparative effectiveness study of primary care PAs and NPs and has become the first PA faculty in the US to receive grant funding from the National Institutes of Health.Nationally, Christine has served on a range of governmental and non-governmental groups, including the Healthy People 2010 Workgroup, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Primary Care Team Workforce Models Workgroup, and the American Academy of Physician Assistant Research Council.  She is currently a member of the advisory board for the Center for Professionalism & Value in Healthcare and the Associate Editor for Research for the Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants.
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
I study the meaningful use of Electronic Health Records data. My research interests sit at the intersection of biostatistics, biomedical informatics, machine learning and epidemiology. I collaborate with researchers both locally at Duke as well as nationally. I am interested in speaking with any students, methodologistis or collaborators interested in EHR data.Please find more information at: https://sites.duke.edu/bgoldstein/
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Goode is an Associate Professor in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. He is a physical therapist by clinical training and epidemiologist by scientific training. His focus is on understanding the etiology of low back pain and other chronic musculoskeletal conditions and improving the delivery of care for patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions.  In his research he has published in the areas of the relationship between individual radiographic features in the lumbar spine and clinical symptoms, biomarkers and peripheral joint osteoarthritis. 
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Greenup is an Associate Professor of Surgery and Population Health Sciences at the Duke School of Medicine and Duke Cancer Institute. She is the founder and co-director of the Duke Breast Cancer Outcomes Research Group, and Core Faculty for the Duke Margolis Center for Health Policy. She earned her undergraduate degrees in Zoology and Psychology at the University of Wisconsin, where she later completed a Masters in Public Health. She attended the Medical College of Wisconsin for Medical School and General Surgery Residency, and went on to complete a Breast Surgical Oncology Fellowship at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. In 2016, she received the National Institutes of Health Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) Award to evaluate how financial costs and burden relate to preference-sensitive decisions for breast cancer surgery. In 2017, she was named the American College of Surgeons & American Society of Breast Surgeons Health Policy Scholar. More broadly, her research focuses on aligning patient-centered care with high quality, lower cost treatment. Dr. Greenup serves on several national committees, including the Alliance in Clinical Oncology Ethics and Value Committees, the American College of Surgeons Cancer Care Delivery Task Force, the American Society of Breast Surgeons Legislative Committee, and the Editorial Board for the Annals of Surgical Oncology. 
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Professor in Population Health Sciences
I am interested in using health economic models to inform decisions related to gynecologic cancers. Specific models have addressed the decision to administer intraperitoneal chemotherapy for newly diagnosed advanced ovarian cancer following optimal cytoreduction, the choice of chemotherapy regimen for recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer, and the exploration of screening strategies for ovarian cancer. The ovarian cancer screening model examines the effects of test cost, sensitivity, specificity, and screen frequency on ovarian cancer mortality, the lifetime false positive rate of testing, the positive predictive value of the test, and its cost effectiveness. This type of model is potentially useful in informing the design trials of novel screening tests for ovarian cancer. I am also conducting a prospective study to quantify the effects of screening for, diagnosis of, and treatment for ovarian cancer on the quality of life of women.
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
I am an interventional cardiologist with a specific focus on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with vascular disease, and I perform coronary and peripheral angiography and interventions. I have a broad background in cardiovascular site-based research, multicenter clinical trials, clinical event classification, and observational analyses.  Currently, I am helping to lead a Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) effort to coordinate a multinational, multicenter randomized clinical trial evaluating antiplatelet agents in the treatment of patients with peripheral artery disease. I have served as a physician reviewer for theClinical Events Classification (CEC) group at the DCRI and have been the Assistant Director of CEC since 2015. I am also the medical director of the Duke Heart Center Clinical Research Unit that manages each clinical research cluster including Cath Lab, EP, Heart Failure, General Cardiology, and Imaging.
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
health services and outcomes research, information-technology enabled registries, supportive oncology and palliative care, quality assessment and improvement
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. LeBlanc is a medical oncologist, palliative care physician, and patient experience researcher.  His clinical practice focuses on the care of patients with hematologic malignancies, with a particular emphasis on myeloid conditions and acute leukemias including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs / MPDs, CML), as well as some lymphomas and multiple myeloma.  He is an active member of the inpatient non-transplant hematologic malignancies care team, based on the 9100 ward of Duke Hospital.His research interests converge on common issues faced by patients with cancer, particularly those with high-risk or relapsed/refractory hematologic malignancies. Issues of symptom burden and quality of life are of central importance in these settings, and may lead patients to face difficult decision-making scenarios. Dr. LeBlanc’s research explores the experience of patients and families in these settings, and aims to improve patients experiences living with blood cancers, including the involvement of specialist palliative care services to provide an extra layer of support along with their comprehensive cancer care.  Dr. LeBlanc is the recipient of a Junior Career Development Award grant from the National Palliative Care Research Center (NPCRC), a Sojourns Scholars Leadership Award from the Cambia Health Foundation, and a Mentored Research Scholar Grant from the American Cancer Society. These grants have funded efforts to better understand the experience of patients living with AML, including studies of symptom burden, quality of life, distress, understanding of prognosis, and treatment decision-making. This work has been mentored by a team of expert researchers, including Drs. Amy Abernethy, James Tulsky, Karen Steinhauser, Kath Pollak, and Peter Ubel.  Dr. LeBlanc's work in palliative care research led to his recognition as an "Inspirational Leader under 40" by the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (AAHPM), and was granted "fellow" status from the Academy in 2016. Dr. LeBlanc is the 2017-18 Chair of the ASCO Ethics Committee, and Chairs the Scientific Review Committee of the NIH/NINR-funded Palliative Care Research Cooperative Group (PCRC; www.palliativecareresearch.org). He represents the Duke Cancer Institute, a National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) member, on the NCCN Panel for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.He completed residency training in Internal Medicine at Duke, as well as fellowships in Medical Oncology and Hospice and Palliative Medicine.  He graduated from the Duke University School of Medicine, also earning a Master of Arts degree in Philosophy during that time, and served as Chief Medical Resident at the Durham VA Medical Center.  He holds board certifications in Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, and in Hospice and Palliative Medicine.  He is actively involved with teaching of medical students and housestaff at Duke, particularly with regards to issues of patient-doctor communication, and is mentoring several Duke trainees on research projects.
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
Richard C. “Chad” Mather III MD, MBA is an assistant professor and vice chairman of practice innovation in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Duke University School of Medicine.  He is also a faculty member at the Duke Clinical Research Institute.  Dr. Mather is a health services researcher and decision scientist with a focus on economic analysis, health policy, health preference measurement and personalized decision-making.  His current work focuses on building tools for healthcare consumerism by facilitating measurement and communication of individual patient preferences in treatment decisions.  Additionally, he has great interest in health innovation, particularly in developing new care and payment models to foster different incentives and practice approaches.  He was a health policy fellow with the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the Arthroscopy Association of North America. Dr. Mather received an undergraduate degree in economics from Miami University and a medical doctorate and masters in business administration from Duke, where he also completed residency training in orthopaedic surgery. He completed a sports medicine fellowship at Rush University Medical Center.  His clinical practice focuses on hip arthroscopy including both FAI and extra-articular hip endoscopy.  Specifically to the hip in addition to health service research applications he conducts translational research on biomarkers and hip instability. 
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
I am a cardiologist with a clinical and research interest in heart failure, including advanced therapies such as cardiac transplantation and mechanical assist devices or “heart pumps." I became a heart failure cardiologist in order to help patients manage their chronic disease over many months and years. I consider myself strongly committed to compassionate patient care with a focus on quality of life and patient preference.My research interests are focused on treating co-morbid diseases in heart failure patients and improving outcomes across the cardiovascular spectrum through clinical trials and outcomes research. Below, you will find my specific research interests:     Co-morbidity characterization (diabetes, sleep apnea, renal failure) in heart failure.     Phenotypic characterization and risk prognostication of patients with heart failure.     Role of surrogate and nonfatal endpoints in clinical heart failure trials.     Biomarkers in heart failure.     Novel pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches to heart failure.     Improving site-based heart failure research.
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Morgan is a health services researcher focusing on PAs and NPs in the health workforce and on outcomes associated with their use in different roles and settings.  As Director of Research in the Duke PA Division, she led the development of the PA Research section, which is one of only a few such groups nationally.  As a practicing PA for 25 years, Dr. Morgan has extensive knowledge of the PA profession from the perspective of a clinician.  As one of a very few national experts on education, practice, and workforce issues related to the PA profession, Dr. Morgan is regularly invited to serve in national and state level policy advisory positions.  Her research, linked below, addresses methodological problems of data sources for use in research on PAs and NPs, the effect of PA use on health resource utilization, and use and roles of PAs and NPs in various settings.
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Kevin Oeffinger, MD, is a family physician, a member of the Duke Cancer Institute (DCI), the founding Director of the DCI Center for Onco-Primary Care, and Director of the DCI Supportive Care and Survivorship Center. Prior to joining Duke in April 2017, Dr. Oeffinger was the Director of the Cancer Survivorship Center at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. He has a long-standing track record of NIH-supported research in cancer screening and survivorship and has served in a leadership capacity in various cancer-focused and primary care-focused national committees and organizations, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Cancer Society, and the American Academy of Family Physicians. The three-fold mission of the DCI Center for Onco-Primary Care are are to: (1) deliver evidence-based, patient-centered, personalized health care across the cancer continuum by enhancing the interface between cancer specialists and primary care clinicians; (2) conduct innovative research with cutting-edge technology that can be translated to the community setting; and (3) train and educate the next generation of clinicians and researchers to extend this mission. In the summer of 2017, Dr. Oeffinger will begin seeing patients at DCI who are cancer survivors and have a high risk of future cancers or have multiple medical problems related to their previous cancer therapy.
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Palmer leads a successful program of clinical, basic and translational research in transplantation and advanced lung diseases. He currently directs the pulmonary research program at the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) and serves as Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Medicine.Dr. Palmer has over 150 peer reviewed publications, received numerous awards, including election into the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) in 2012, chaired many sessions at national and international meetings, serves regularly on NIH study sections, and is on the editorial board of many prominent journals. He is also Associate Director of the Clinical Research Training Program at Duke and has personally mentored over 40 pre-and post-doctoral trainees, many of whom are now engaged in their own successful research careers. His scientific accomplishments include the first human studies to demonstrate the importance of innate immunity in transplant rejection and completion of a prospective multicenter study that improved CMV prevention after lung transplantation.Current basic projects in the lab are studying the role of the matrix in the activation of innate immunity in pulmonary transplant rejection, and epithelial injury and repair in the development of toxin induced bronchiolitis obliterans. Translational and human projects are studying predictors of lung transplant survival in the UNOS database, immune monitoring to predict CMV infection and acute rejection after lung transplantation, and the use of novel inhaled antibiotics in lung transplantation. The lab is also using cutting edge whole exome genetic sequencing to identify genetic predictors of transplant rejection.Dr. Palmer also leads trials coordinated through the DCRI that study the natural history and investigate new treatments for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), chronic lung transplant rejection, and posttransplant cytomegalovirus infection.
Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences
The major themes that embody Dr. Pastva's scholarly pursuits include:  a) mechanisms of physical reserve and resilience; b) rehabilitation strategies for improving the health and function of individuals living with chronic cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases and/or surviving critical illness; and c) pedagogical strategies that will optimize health professions curricula to address clinical practice expectations in aging and acute or critical illness. In addition to her faculty appointments, she is a Senior Fellow in the Duke Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, a Duke Pepper Older American Independence Center (OAIC) Scholar, and a member of the Center’s Physical Measures Core. She serves as an advisor in Duke Health's Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Physical Therapy Residency Program and on the Steering Committee of Chancellor Washington's Translating Duke Health Initiative in Cardiovascular Health. She also serves on the American Physical Therapy Association’s ICU Rehabilitation Clinical Guideline Development Group and on the Research Committee of its Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Section.
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Jonathan P. Piccini, MD, MHS is a clinical cardiac electrophysiologist and Associate Professor of Medicine at Duke University Medical Center and the Duke Clinical Research Institute. His research interests include the conduct of clinical trials and the assessment of cardiovascular therapeutics for the care of patients with heart rhythm disorders. At present, he is the Director of the EP Clinical Trials Program and Arrhythmia Core Laboratory at Duke University. He also serves on the Clinical Working Group of the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines – Atrial fibrillation (GWTG-Afib) registry program. He is an associate editor for the American Heart Journal and serves on the editorial board of Heart Rhythm, the European Heart Journal, and the Journal of Cardiac Electrophysiology. He is the Principal Investigator of the data and coordinating center for ORBIT AF, a 25,000 patient registry focused on quality of care and improving outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation. He is also the PI of the GENETIC AF clinical trial, the first clinical trial to study genotype-directed rhythm control therapy for atrial fibrillation. He also serves on the steering committees of multiple international randomized trials focused on the treatment of atrial fibrillation.  Dr. Piccini has more than 175 publications in the field of heart rhythm medicine. Clinically, his focus is on the care of patients with atrial fibrillation and complex arrhythmias, with particular emphasis on catheter ablation and lead extraction.
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Rebecca Shelby, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University and the Director of Education and Training for the Duke Cancer Patient Support Program.  Dr. Shelby is a member of the Duke Pain Prevention and Treatment Research Program and the Duke Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program. Dr. Shelby completed her graduate training in clinical psychology at the Ohio State University and her clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Duke University Medical Center.  Her research focuses on developing and evaluating behavioral interventions for cancer patients, management of cancer pain and treatment side effects, and improving adherence to recommended care. Dr. Shelby serves on the Duke clinical psychology internship faculty and supervises clinical psychology fellows, interns, and clinical psychology graduate practicum students completing clinical rotations as part of the Duke Cancer Patient Support Program.   
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Smith is interested in the impact of lifestyle interventions, such as diet and exercise, on neurocognitive function and mood. He has also published multiple studies examining the relationship between cardiovascular disease, major depressive disorder, and neurocognitive outcomes, preoperative predictors of postoperative delirium, the impact of cardiothoracic interventions on neurocognitive outcomes, and the relationship between patterns of dietary intake and cardiovascular outcomes. He is also interested in the role of modifiable risk factors, such as physical inactivity and psychosocial stress, on clinical outcomes in solid organ transplant recipients.
Professor in Population Health Sciences
Professor in Population Health Sciences
My major area of research is cardiovascular disease prevention. I am particularly interested in improving detection and control of hypertension. Since assessment of blood pressure begins with measurement, my studies often include out-of-office BP measurement techniques including 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring and home BP monitoring. I am also interested in obesity prevention, and in another line of research am examining the effectiveness of food labeling policies (such as calorie-labeling) on people's food and physical activity decisions. As a family physician, I enjoy providing full-scope primary care (acute care, chronic illness care, preventive services) to patients of all ages and from all walks of life.
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Walsh’s research program focuses on genetic and epigenetic factors contributing to cancer predisposition in children and adults, with a special interest in brain tumors. This research is informed by both epidemiology and anthropological genetics, with computational work stressing statistical methodologies for “gene hunting” (e.g. GWAS, fine-mapping, admixture mapping, whole-genome sequencing). The laboratory engages in functional genomics research, investigating the biological impact of genetic variants linked to cancer risk, with a particular focus on regulation of telomere maintenance in pre-malignant cells. 
Professor in Population Health Sciences
The focus of my research is disordered mineral metabolism across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease, including dialysis, kidney transplantation and earlier stages.My research has been published in leading general medicine and subspecialty journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Circulation, Cell Metabolism, Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, and Kidney International, among others.My primary contributions have been in the area of hormonal regulation of phosphate homeostasis. I have helped to characterize the physiological role of fibroblast growth factor 23 in health and in chronic kidney disease, and the impact of elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 levels on adverse clinical outcomes in patients with kidney disease.
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Dr. Zafar is a health services researcher with a focus in improving care delivery for patients with advanced cancer. He has obtained advanced training in health services research and has participated in single-institution, multi-institution and national studies focusing on access to care, cost of care, and comparative effectiveness of care delivery between health systems. His primary area of interest is in the cost of cancer care. He has conducted institutional and national studies on how treatment-related costs impact cancer patients' experience. His current work in this arena is focused on patient preferences regarding cost-related communication and decision-making. A second field of interest is palliative care. Dr. Zafar has collaborated with national and international palliative care leaders to improve the design and delivery of palliative care in cancer clinical trials. Methodologically, this work has centered around systematic literature reviews, iterative surveys, and prospective clinical trials. Dr. Zafar is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Health Disparities and Clinical Practice Guideline Committees. He is a member of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology's Health Disparities and Health Outcomes Committees. Dr. Zafar's work has been funded by the American Cancer Society, the HealthWell Foundation, the Duke Cancer Prevention and Control Program, the Duke Clinical Research Institute, and the CALGB Foundation.

Adjunct Appointments

Adjunct Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences
Kathryn E. Flynn, PhD, is an adjunct assistant professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Duke University School of Medicine. She works primarily at the Duke Clinical Research Institute. Dr. Flynn was trained in sociology and population health sciences at the University of Wisconsin, where she worked with Maureen Smith on the development and fielding of new survey instruments to assess health care access and utilization in the near elderly as part of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a long-term cohort study with over 10,000 participants. In 2005, Dr. Flynn was awarded an R36 dissertation grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to use the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study to examine preferences for health care decision making among older adults. Findings from this research have been published in Social Science and Medicine and the Journal of General Internal Medicine. As a postdoctoral fellow at the Duke Clinical Research Institute, Dr. Flynn trained under Kevin Weinfurt, gaining experience in the design and analysis of patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials. Dr. Flynn's research interests include shared medical decision making; patient-provider relationships, including communication, trust, and technology; quality of medical care; patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials; and quantitative and qualitative methods in behavioral research.Areas of Expertise: Health Measurement, Health Services Research, and Health Behavior
Adjunct Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences
Dr. Susan M. Kansagra currently serves as Chief of Chronic Disease and Injury for the NC Division of Public Health, where she oversees initiatives related to health promotion and disease prevention including tobacco control, chronic disease prevention, injury and violence prevention, and the public health response for addressing the opioid crisis. Her previous roles include serving as Deputy Commissioner at the New York City Health Department, where she led ground-breaking policies and programs aimed at reducing chronic disease, as well as, Assistant Vice President of Population Health at NYC Health + Hospitals, where she led clinical quality improvement initiatives for the country’s largest public health care system. She has published extensively on topics related to public health and serves on the Board of the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors. Dr. Kansagra completed her internal medicine training at Massachusetts General Hospital and her medical and business degrees from Duke University. Areas of Expertise: Health Policy, Health Behavior, and Epidemiology
Adjunct Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences
Adjunct Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences
Area of Expertise: Health Policy
Adjunct Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences

Visiting Scholars

Visiting Research Scholar in the Department of Population Health Sciences
Visiting Research Scholar in the Department of Population Health Sciences
Visiting Research Scholar in the Department of Population Health Sciences